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Articles,Books,Videos Reviewed Susan Freis Falknor on 19 Jul 2015 03:00 pm

“Day of the Dead”: A Gripping Novel Helping All Americans See Israel Straight

By Susan Freis Falknor

Day of the Dead: Book One – Gaza  — By Captain Dan Gordon, IDF (Res)

This fast-paced novel, set in last year’s Hamas-Israel Tunnel War, could sharpen the way that many Americans perceive Israel and the Islamist threat that nation faces.

And the story will enable Americans to more fully recognize our own vulnerability to that looming horror.

Author Dan Gordon is an American movie writer and novelist–a real pro.

He also holds dual U.S. and Israel citizenship, and is a reserve captain in the Israel Defense Force (IDF).

His satirical White House scenes skewer the Obama Regime’s decision making.

The main characters are members of an observation team sent by the White House into Israel, plus their middle-aged Israeli IDF sherpa.

But the story turns on details that could only have come from personal observation or first-hand accounts.

At some point, you just say, “you can’t make this stuff up.”

What stands out most is the convincing picture of the Israeli people enduring the tunnel war.

Gordon shows them living almost normal lives thanks to the protection of the Iron Dome anti-missile defense system, only having to duck for a short time into shelters located at public places and set along the highway.

A teenage girl doing everyday duty in the defense force of her Gaza-border kibbutz, watching monitors in real time, becomes the key link in the chain of civil defense, as she spots the terrorists breaking out from their tunnel in a wheat field.

Gordon’s “Day of the Dead” could also enable us to see Israel in the manner Americans saw the enduring, spirited people of London during the Blitz (click here) –the German air attacks of 1940–a year before the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and brought us into the war.

Day of the Dead could become another Uncle Tom’s Cabin for our post-9/11 world, especially when the narrative becomes a “major motion picture” as promised on the back cover.

For anti-slavery idealists, Uncle Tom’s Cabin acted as a zoom lens that transformed American slavery from a concerning but rather distant, almost abstract evil into an array of sharply etched, convincing characters, real people, black and white, caught in a diabolical system that seemed to allow for no reform.

The classic touched thousands of hearts and changed official outlooks (click here).

“Uncle Tom” has been turned into a pejorative term. But the novel itself, published a decade before the Civil War, portrayed Tom as a long-suffering Christian, a man whose faith enables him to love and forgive those who oppress him. To idealistic abolitionists, the enslaved Tom became a recognizable, noble human being.

Day of the Dead might well become a similar prism for us, as we wait for other 9/11 shoes to drop.

Will it help us revive the post-attack resolve that seems to have petered out, even as we face a resurgent Islamic Jihad with its determined final solution of putting the whole world under savage Sharia law?

Unfortunately, too many of our citizens have been touched by the influence (overt and subliminal) of the anti-Israel narrative arising from today’s Leftist-Islamist alliance.(Click here to see David Horowitz’ Islamo-Fascism and the War Against the Jews)

This tendentious Leftist-Islamist slant has colored the way much of our media portray Israel today: a technologically advanced nation but fundamentally an oppressor of a victimized Palestinian people.

Lamentably today’s contemporary anti-Semitic narrative has penetrated our “mainstream” media, academia, and, sadly, made inroads into the national offices of our “mainline” churches.

Day of the Dead: Book Two will be set on the U.S. southern border: terrorists equipped with Kalishnikovs, suicide vests, and plastic handcuffs will use Mexican drug tunnels to enter San Diego to stage mass killings and kidnappings. See our closely related Weigh Warnings On ISIS Tunnels!

 

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