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First things . . . Richard Falknor on 11 Nov 2015 04:47 pm

Veterans Day 2015: Preserving Our National Heritage To Guide And Energize Our Next Generations

All our military history and much more should be part of our national conversation–– not topics relegated to the archives of academics and locked away from school children.

This last year has revealed even more sharply the organized civic collapse of undergraduate bodies in too many of our universities.

Most recently, Yale University and the University of Missouri have brought shame to what was once the higher learning in America.

As Andrew McCarthy wrote yesterday–

“The university is a terrible deal for the country and for too many students. It is no longer a center of learning and the promotion of reason. It is a cauldron of hard Left indoctrination and victim narratives where reason no longer has a home.” 

What does this mean for Veterans Day 2015?

It means that not just commemorating but building upon our national heritage — including our military history — will rest even more on the shoulders of American families and patriotic citizens.

For the serious study and appreciation of America’s achievements are increasingly unwelcome in many of our taxpayer-supported schools and colleges.

Keeping Faith With Our Veterans!

Below is what we wrote on November 11, 2011–

What we conservatives can do ourselves and do now is teach ourselves, our families, our children, about the victories, hardships, misadventures, and traditions of our fighting men and women since the colonial wars in New England and the beginnings of the Republic.

We can talk with our friends and colleagues about about the complexities of the Barbary Wars (with their implications for today) and  the “Shores of Tripoli.”

We can try to understand how Abraham Lincoln managed his generals – at least that Republican didn’t promise to “talk to his generals” before he could figure out his war aims.

We can try to learn some lessons from the many-front struggle with Germany, Italy, and the Empire of Japan in World War II.

We can remember the fearful price we paid in Korea from post-World-War-II neglect (scroll down) of our forces.

Most of all, we can appreciate the skill and endurance of our forces from Roger’s Rangers in the French and Indian War, to Washington’s crossing to Trenton, to Joshua Chamberlain at Gettysburg, to Torpedo Eight at Midway, and to the epic Marine breakout from the Chosin Reservoir in Korea.

All this military history and much more should be part of our national conversation –– not topics relegated to the archives of academics and locked away from school children.

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