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Culture wars Richard Falknor on 15 Apr 2008 08:33 pm

General Assembly ’08: helping illegals, trashing our heritage

The leadership of the 2008 Maryland General Assembly distinguished itself by doing nothing to check the influx of illegals into Maryland, and went out of its way to try to discredit the culture and language which has given us our freedom and prosperity. Scroll down to see the committee failures to act positively, and the votes of approval in both chambers on measures that should have died.

Why should even legal immigrants try to assimilate when the legislature of one of the original thirteen states won’t recognize English as that state’s official language?

And citizens and non-citizens alike can no longer confidently look to Maryland’s schools of higher learning to teach the fundamentals of Western culture. If the Maryland Establishment doesn’t believe in our core heritage enough to transmit it to the Free State’s most promising young men and women, why should immigrants bother to learn it?

Some Republicans might be shocked to realize that by their voting to clamp “cultural diversity” even more broadly and firmly into the life of Maryland’s colleges and universities, they sent just that signal of indifference to our heritage to a wider public. And cultural Marxism or so-called multiculturalism is nothing to be trifled with. Maryland universities, private or even community colleges should not be official collectivist reeducation camps for our captive sons and daughters.

Maybe some Republicans thought issues like “cultural diversity” were “inside baseball” and no one would pay attention.

But the Hoover Institution’s Stanley Kurtz has a smarter perspective:

“The Bush administration’s attitude was that Bill Bennett/Lynn Cheney-type culture war issues sap political capital that could more profitably be put toward the war effort or social security reform. This was a huge mistake. Fighting the education culture war would have accumulated political capital. When it comes to the left-leaning craziness of the education system, the public is with us. The Lawrence Summers dispute, for example, was a disaster for the academy in the public eye. Linking the Democrats with their crazy leftist pals in the academy is the best way to beat them. The public is with us on this.[Underscoring BRF’s.]

MEASURES THAT THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY SHOULD HAVE PASSED

(The links and accompanying titles are all from the General Assembly website; BRF’s interspersed comments are in italics.)

 

HOUSE BILL 288

Vehicle Laws – Proof of Legal Presence Act of 2008

3/21 Unfavorable Report by Judiciary

SENATE BILL 52

Task Force to Study the Cost of Illegal Aliens in Maryland

No Action
The proposed Pipkin Commission would be staffed by the Department of Business and Economic Development, and would focus on the fiscal impact of illegals.

SENATE BILL 34

Election Law – Voter Registration – Proof of Citizenship
No Action

SENATE BILL 40

Higher Education – Prohibition on Illegal Aliens from Receiving In-State Tuition Status

3/4 Unfavorable Report by Education Health and Environmental Affairs

SENATE BILL 84

State Government – Public Benefits and Services – Illegal Aliens
No Action

HOUSE BILL 604

Public Benefits – Requirement of Proof of Lawful Presence

4/7 Unfavorable Report by Appropriations

MEASURES OR PROVISIONS LAWMAKERS SHOULD NOT HAVE PASSED

$1,000,000 appropriation to CASA of Maryland.
A House and a Senate floor amendment to delete these appropriations failed.

http://mlis.state.md.us/2008rs/votes/house/0415.htm
http://mlis.state.md.us/2008rs/votes/senate/0380.htm

 

HOUSE BILL 610 | SENATE BILL 506

Task Force on the Preservation of Heritage Language Skills in Maryland.
Click here to go to the Heritage Languages in America website and read about their core principles:

“At the national level, multilingualism benefits the United States by making this country better equipped to meet its language needs domestically, as a pluralistic society, and internationally”

No recognition of English as the official language: see Dwyer amendment.
House

March 19, 2008: Floor Amendment (Dwyer) Rejected (51-82)
March 30, 2008: Third Reading Passed (99-40)

Senate

April 4, 2008: Third Reading Passed (37-8)

SENATE BILL 475 | HOUSE BILL 1602

Commission to Study the Impact of Immigrants in Maryland

The proposed Madaleno Commission (SB475) would be staffed by the University of Maryland College Park, and its enabling language lumps together legals and illegals in its study of “the economic and fiscal impact of immigrants on the State.” The proposed Pipkin Commission (SB52) would have been staffed by the Department of Business and Economic Development, and would focus on the fiscal impact of illegals.

People are policy in almost every undertaking. Thus this identity-politics provision in SB475 is revealing:

“To the extent practicable, the members appointed to the Commission shall reasonably reflect the geographic, racial, ethnic, cultural, and gender diversity of the State.”

House

  • April 2, 2008: Third Reading Passed (129-10)
  • Senate

  • April 1, 2008: Third Reading Passed (45-2)
  • HOUSE BILL 905 | SENATE BILL 438

    Institutions of Higher Education – Plans for Programs of Cultural Diversity

    NOTE: HB905(”cultural diversity) and HB610 (multilingualism) have eight common sponsors: Delegates Pena-Melnyk, Ali, Lee, Manno, Nathan-Pulliam, Ramirez, Reznik, and Valderrama

    “Cultural diversity” legislation advances the destruction of core American culture in Maryland colleges and universities. The measures are intrusive, reaching many private as well as public Maryland colleges and universities. They will likely result in an additional loss of free speech in higher education in the Free State, and more enforced programs of multiculturalism, i.e. anti-Western values, taught to students with no depth in the study of history. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), for example, last year named Johns Hopkins University as its first-ever “Censor of the Year for 2006.

    Read this for more detail.

    House

    April 7, 2008: Third Reading Passed (113-27)

    Senate

    April 7, 2008: Third Reading Passed (40-5)


    
    
    
    
    
    															
    				
    				
    				

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